MTPR

Corin Cates-Carney

Capitol Reporter

Corin Cates-Carney is the Capitol Bureau reporter for MTPR,  Corin was formerly MTPR's Flathead area reporter.

Corin has worked for NPR, and is a UM Journalism School Graduate.

Contact Corin Cates-Carney:
Email: corin.cates-carney@mtpr.org
Mobile: 253-495-5193
Capitol Office:  406-444-9399

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Kathleen Williams is the Democratic candidate for Montana's lone U.S. House seat.
Olga Kreimer


We’re going on the road with Kathleen Williams, the Democratic candidate for Montana’s single seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, currently held by Republican Greg Gianforte.

More than 40 people came to the DPHHS hearing on Medicaid cuts Thursday, Feb. 01, 2018 in Helena.
Corin Cates-Carney

Now that improved state revenues mean that more than $45 million is being restored to state agencies, the directors for the state budget and health departments are meeting with health care providers to talk specifics.

The Rosendale Campaign took this photo of what they say is the glass of a broken window at their office in Billings. A police report on the incident was filed Wednesday.
Courtesy Rosendale Campaign

Republican U.S. Senate Candidate Matt Rosendale sent a fundraising email Thursday saying that his Billings office was vandalized earlier this week when Vice President Mike Pence was in the city campaigning for him. Billings police say the case has run cold with no evidence of motive or a suspect.

Secretary of State Corey Stapleton meets with county election officials August 10, 2017.
Corin Cates-Carney

Secretary of State Corey Stapleton says Montana’s election system was probed by Russia during the 2016 election cycle.

Stapleton’s acknowledgement comes after a member of his staff told the Associated Press that Montana was not among the 21 states targeted by hackers in 2016.

Montana Governor Steve Bullock and Lieutenant Governor Mike Cooney talk with reporters in the Capitol about restoring funding for some state budget cuts, July 25, 2018.
Corin Cates-Carney

Governor Steve Bullock says state agencies will soon see some of the more than $70 million in state budget cuts made during last November’s special session restored, because state revenues have bounced back.

“As we close the fiscal year we find that we’ll have the ability to put about $45 million to restore some of the cuts that occurred,” Bullock said.

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