MTPR

Bill Dial

Whitefish Middle School.
Josh Burnham

One week after students across Montana walked out of class to advocate for safer schools, parents, teachers and school administrators in Whitefish are proposing safety upgrades to the district's public schools

The Whitefish School Board set up a citizens work group on safety and security last fall. Patty Johnson is a member.

Whitefish, MT rail depot.
Flickr user Roy Luck (CC-BY-2)

The neo-Nazi website proposing an armed march through Whitefish on Martin Luther King Day now says it's postponing its planned demonstration, after failing to submit a complete event permit application earlier this week.

People gathered in Whitefish's Depot Park for a "Love Not Hate" Rally Saturday, January 7, 2017.
Nicky Ouellet

City managers in Whitefish say they’ve received an application for a special event permit from a neo-Nazi website. But, it’s incomplete.

A few weeks ago, the Daily Stormer proposed an armed march against Jewish families and businesses in Whitefish in January.

Whitefish residents held a "love not hate" rally January 7, 2017 in response to calls from a neo-Nazi website to target locals with anti-Semitic online harassment.
Nicky Ouellet

Temperatures were in the single digits Saturday morning in Whitefish, but that didn’t stop a few hundred people from flooding the streets downtown for a block party. With the ski hill as a backdrop, Jessica Loti Leferrier addressed a bundled-up crowd milling around heat lamps and spilling onto snowbanks.

"The extremist groups that have been making all the news do not represent us," she said.

Whitefish Police Chief Bill Dial addressing the Glacier Country Pachyderm Club in Kalispell Friday
Nicky Ouellet

Whitefish Chief of Police Bill Dial says he’s doubtful a threatened armed march through Whitefish will actually happen.

A neo-Nazi website is calling for the march on Martin Luther King Day.

Pages